‘There was no question that she was going to go to the ground’: Police officer who saved lives on the night of MH17

The first thing a police officer in Malaysia’s far north has to do is determine what happened.

In a country where the truth is often murky, there is no simple answer to that question.

So how could she be at the scene of the tragedy when no-one was there?

That was the question police officer Jehmood, 24, had to answer when he stepped into the middle of the chaotic chaos of the night.

“I saw a girl in a white robe,” Jehmod told Al Jazeera.

“There was a police box in front of the police station.

And I realised that there was no doubt that she would go to that place.” “

Then I saw an officer on a stretcher, who was running towards the girl.

And I realised that there was no doubt that she would go to that place.”

Jehmodd, who is the first member of the Malaysian police force to have served in this role, had just arrived at the station at around 11pm on July 17, when he heard the sirens of helicopters, and was told that an airliner had crashed.

“It’s hard to describe what I was feeling, but I was really shaken,” he said.

I thought we were going to be rescued, and then he saw the girl and ran towards her. “

The officer on the stretcher started running towards us, and we followed him.

I just thought that she had fallen in. “

And when I looked up, I saw that the girl was actually in the box, which I recognised as a police station, and it was full of people.

My heart was racing’ Jehmoda, who has a five-year-old son, rushed to the girl, who suffered serious head injuries. “

She was on the floor, and she was not breathing.”‘

My heart was racing’ Jehmoda, who has a five-year-old son, rushed to the girl, who suffered serious head injuries.

He tried to save her life, but she did not respond.

“We were talking to the female officer and she started asking questions, and her body language was very aggressive, so it was difficult for me to control her,” Jehnod said.

When the officer asked her what had happened, Jehmody saw her hands and legs move.

“When I got close to her, I noticed that she started screaming, and there was blood on her face and the floor,” he added.

She was still alive, but my heart is not racing. “

So I grabbed her, and tried to put her on the ground.

She was still alive, but my heart is not racing.

I have never seen such a young girl die like that.

I am so thankful for what I did.”

Jehnood said the girl told him that she did, indeed, fall in, and that she suffered a fractured jaw and multiple lacerations.

He managed to save the girl’s life by applying a first aid kit and then helping her to a waiting ambulance.

“After that, she was taken to the police officer who was waiting outside, and when I saw the police, I started shouting at them,” Jehhmood said.

He said that after he finished helping the girl to a ambulance, he saw a paramedic walk in, while Jehmoud said he was not told why he was being escorted by police.

“He was talking to a colleague who was standing by, and he was trying to calm me down, but it was very difficult for him to calm down because of the adrenaline,” Jehlood said of the paramedic.

“Some of the policemen also told me that they were waiting outside and were talking about an ambulance and then the paramedics came in and took her to the ambulance.”

“I don’t think there were any police officers on duty, and the ambulance was parked nearby.”

A month later, Jehnodd would be called to duty again, when another Malaysian police officer was injured in a separate crash.

The officer who had fallen was later confirmed to have died.

“This was the first time I had ever been called to work, and they asked me if I had seen anything that was suspicious or unusual, and so I told them what I had,” Jehanod said, adding that the police did not even inform him of the accident until five days later.

He has since been promoted to assistant commissioner, but he said he still felt that the officers who took him on to the case, were not aware of what was happening.

“They asked me what happened, and me and my colleagues were not sure if I was the only one to be injured.

In my experience, the officers are not always honest with each other.” The